Home » Uncategorized » How to use multilevel numbered headings in Word 2007

How to use multilevel numbered headings in Word 2007

Creating and fixing multi-level numbered headings in Word might seem to be a bit tricky for the first time users. Nevertheless, if you know the correct procedure, this would cease to be a problem. The following procedure may help you in this regard:

The Procedure

Firstly, we will define the multilevel numbering for the heading levels using Multilevel List feature.

1.     Open the Word document in which you want to apply numbered headings.

2.     From the Word Ribbon menu, under the tab Home and within the group Paragraph, click the Multilevel List icon multi list button .  A drop-down menu appears.

(Click the image to view in full screen)

define new multi level list

2.     From the drop-down menu, select the option Define New Multilevel List (at the bottom of the menu). The “Define New Multilevel List” dialog box pops up.

3.     Click the More button  (Picture1)  available at the bottom of the dialog box. The dialog box expands to show additional fields (see below image).

define new multi level list dialog
Create First Level Heading   (or define number format for the first level heading)

4.     Click level “1” from Click level to modify selection box (on the top left hand side of the dialog box).

5.     From the drop-down list named Link level to style, select “Heading 1”.  This way, you are linking heading level “1″  (that you will use in your document) to Word’s default Heading 1 style from the Styles gallery. Later, you can modify style for each heading as you wish.

6.     In this step, enter a numbering format for your heading level 1 in the field Enter formatting for number from the drop-drop-down list Number style for this level. So, the format you select from the drop-down list will appear in the Enter formatting for number field. You can delete the default number format appearing in the Enter formatting for number field and choose your own.

Important:
a.    You can reset the value in the Enter formatting for number field by selecting a value from the spin box Start at.
b.    If you find the field Number style for this level as disabled, clear the check box Legal style numbering.
Creating Second Level Heading

7.     Similarly, select level “2” from Click level to modify selection box.

8.     Link level 2 to Word’s default Heading 2 by selecting “Heading 2” from the Link level to style drop-down list.

9.     Delete whatever appears (by default) in the field Enter formatting for number to apply a new number format. From the field Include level number from, select Level 1 (as a prefix) for the second level heading. Apply a dot (.) or anything you would like after the prefix number. I prefer a dot.

10.     After a dot (.)select a numbering format for the Level 2 heading (e.g. 1.1). You are done.

11.     Similarly, you can keep adding levels as needed. While creating the third heading, select Level 1 and Level 2 headings as prefixes from the Include Level Number from field and then select a number format for the Level 3 heading (e.g. 1.1.1 ).

The following example shows how to construct the Heading level 4.

untitled
Once you are done with defining number format for all the headings, you can view the same being updated in the Styles gallery, under the tab Home, within the group Styles in the Ribbon. Or, you can open the Styles window by pressing Shift+Ctrl+Alt+S.

Now, select text in your document (which you want as a heading) and then click the relevant heading style (which you have just created) from the Styles gallery.

Please note that you may not see all the  multilevel heading levels (that you have just created) in the gallery depending on the configuration of the Style Pane Options. You can open the Style Pane Options dialog box by clicking the Options link available at the bottom of the Styles gallery pane. See below image.

untitled

The Style Pane Options window appears. Click Select styles to show drop-down list and select the option All Styles from the list. Click OK. Now you can view all the 9 heading levels with multilevel numbering in the Styles gallery.
Modify the appearance of the headings

You can modify the style (font, numbering, etc.) of the headings from the styles gallery by selecting Modify from the right-click menu of each heading and then clicking the Untitled button from the Modify Style dialog box.

For example, if you want your Heading 1 to have font “Cambria”, font size “14″, Bold, color Blue then configure these in the Modify Style dialog box as shown in the following screenshot.

untitled

You can also apply these style by clicking the Format  button available at the bottom of the Modify Style dialog box and then clicking the Font from the sub-menu. This will display the Font dialog box where you can apply font styles for Heading 1.

Similarly, you can modify other properties of the headings by selecting the appropriate options from the Format sub-menu.

Please let me know in the comment section if you have any difficulty understanding the procedure or if you have any other queries, suggestions, etc. I will be more than happy to help you out! Thank you.

 

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28 Comments

  1. Rosie says:

    Reblogged this on Twin Lens Abstract and commented:
    For anyone who has ever wanted to throw their computer out the window when trying to deal with numbered headings in a huge document (i.e. my thesis!)… salvation is here!

  2. Rosie says:

    THANK-YOU SO MUCH! I add myself to the surely huge list of panicked PhD students you have calmed by solving numbering issues!! :)

  3. mfon says:

    hi, thanks for your post.
    can we have headings in tables show on the navigation pane?
    need to crack this ASAP.
    thanks alot.

    • wordknowhow says:

      Yes, you can have headings within a table….same logic. The navigation pane (view >> show >> navigation pane) displays heading levels created in the document by default.

  4. Fiskehode says:

    Thank you so much for posting this guide. I’ve trying to figure out how to do this for a while. I can’t believe they’ve actually made this more complicated in newer versions of word.

  5. […] this guy has a write-up that reveals the secret! You assign the style to list from the list configuration, […]

  6. Bavo says:

    After hours of searching the web, you’ve nailed it. As a teacher I should have known this, but I didn’t. Now I do :)

    Thanks!

  7. Anonymous says:

    Thx for the tip

  8. […] you really need to do is create a Multilevel List and then tie the list to the Heading Styles.  A fine set of instructions is found here.  These are old instructions, but they also work in Word […]

  9. Kev says:

    Great post. I would add that if you want to preserve what was done above, you should save the doc as a new template. Otherwise it is based on the default normal.dot template which might be different on different computers or may be change when changes are made to other docs.

  10. Anonymous says:

    Thank you!!! This saved me so much time.
    I have a silly question – header vs heading? is there any way to use headers to map a document as well? Word’s user manual seems to suggest this (by adding in page breaks between each section), but I found this very frustrating and the headers kept switching back to each other…

    • wordknowhow says:

      Welcome! Headers and Headings are two different entities. Heading refers to paragraph headings in Word such as Heading 1, Heading 2, etc. You can use these headings to create Table of Content i.e. as references for various sections in the document.

      Whereas, Header is a piece of information put at the top section of a document that represents title of the document or a chapter of a document. Headers cannot be used as part of Table of Content.

      However, you can create unique headers/footers for different document parts/sections in the same document. The following article will help you understand this:

      http://wordknowhow.wordpress.com/2013/01/22/how-to-create-different-header-and-footer-in-same-word-document/

  11. WeThotUWasAToad says:

    Thanks for the article. I found it very helpful but I’m confused by the terminology: Headings vs. Multilevel List. I followed your steps but ended up with a doc in which each new row comes with a Normal Style so if I want it numbered, an additional step is required to designate it as such. How can I set up a Multilevel List so that when the [Enter] key is pressed, a new row appears which is already at the same heading level as the previous row and displays the next number in sequence?

    • wordknowhow says:

      Glad to hear that you have liked the article…thanks!
      You See, Headings and Multilevel list usually are the same. When you say Headings in Word, it refers to the built-in headings. These headings are used in the Multilevel list as outlines in a document. Heading 1 is used as the first level of a Multilevel list, Heading 2 as the second level of the list, etc. and then you can generate a Table of Content out it.
      When you create a Multilevel list like this in your document, you can easily promote or demote a level. To promote, place cursor at the beginning of a heading and then press CTRL+SHIFT. Similarly, to demote click SHIFT.
      Please, carefully follow the steps mentioned in the procedure….it will definitely work. Let me know if you have any issue.

  12. Tim Dunn says:

    … additionally, with regard to your comment on

    http://blogs.msdn.com/b/timid/archive/2013/08/29/stupid-microsoft-word-trick-multilevel-numbered-headings.aspx

    I’ve added the following response:

    “Hi, wordknowhow.

    Firstly, thank you for the original post that led to this one. Please note that I retain the attribution.

    - I’ve truncated the blog post so it doesn’t have the disputed content.

    - I disagree it is a copy – all the text and screenshots are original. I did this because:

    * I wanted to add the Ribbon hotkey sequences.

    * I added the reminder to use ‘Set for all levels’ for “Additional indent for each level” (please see steps 8 and 9 in any cached copy of this page) so the headings would be consistently left-aligned

    * I found the original post to be less than ideal. I prefer complex processes to be cleanly numbered with sparse text. It seems especially appropriate given this topic.

    I would like to restore the elided content, but will not do so as long as you feel this is somehow a copy. However, if you do feel this way, I am curious on what grounds you feel it is indeed a copy.

    In closing, thank you for the original post.”

  13. Tim Dunn says:

    Thanks for this post. I’ve found it quite useful multiple times in the past.

  14. Dag Hovland says:

    This was hugely helpful.

    I had a work document that was giving me

    1
    1.1
    1.1.1
    1.2
    1.3
    1.1.2
    2
    2.1
    1.1.3
    2.2
    1.1.4

    The best suggestion in-house was to manually override every time it was out of sync. That would have made me want to cry.

    Following the recipe fixed it so that it’s now

    1
    1.1
    1.1.1
    1.2
    1.3
    1.3.1
    2
    2.1
    2.1.1
    2.2
    2.2.1

    I will sleep much better tonight than I feared.

  15. Balaji says:

    thank you it had helped me a lot

    • wordknowhow says:

      Glad to hear that….thanks!!

    • Stu says:

      My Word 2010 heading numbering issue were automatically transferred to Word 2013 when I upgraded.

      After months of reading other blogs (who mad to feel stupid) it was this article, based on Word 2007, that saved me from going postal. Go figure. And no thanks to Microsoft.

      MS Word 2013:
      1. In the tab called “Home”,
      2. Go to “Paragraph” section,
      3. Go Multilevel List drop-down menu,
      4. Go to Define New Multilevel List to create new and edit current lists.

      Note 1: Heading numbering changes do not apply to existing documents. Changes only apply to new documents created after the changes were made.

      Note 2: Within the Multilevel List I changed the Indents to zero thus creating a new issue with the Heading indents/spacings. But for now I can live with that.

      Thanks Balaji.

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